An Incomplete Visual Dictionary of Women's Symbols from Various Cultures. 

Hu(man) Nature is a group exhibition curated by Isabelle Thul and presenting works by the artists giacinta frisillo, Hana Wilde and Sukhy Parhar. Visitors to the exhibition are welcomed into a hypothetical landscape in which performances and sculptural works inspire an agency and activism within the individual.

 

Approaching ecology from an intersectional feminist position, Hu(man) Nature responds to the web of exploitation that has led to our current ecological crisis. The works challenge current modes of production upon which the exploitation of land and its resources is built, by stressing the interrelatedness of human and non-human nature. Critiquing the constructed hyper-separation* between species, nations, races and classes the exhibition calls for a more holistic understanding of ecological practices.

 

The exhibition is staged in two iterations with the first taking place in Glasgow Autonomous Space in July 2019 and the second a site-specific version of the hypothetical landscape migrates to the Tontine Gallery for the GSA Graduate Degree Show 2019.

 

* as used by Val Plumwood.

The hour-long durational performance and installation, Shadows, takes, as its starting point, the association between hidden labour and what has traditionally been labelled 'women's work'. The arduous process of painting women's symbols onto the ground and printing them on cleaning utensils only to wash them away in great effort reflects a frustration with unjust modes of production that are based on the exploitation of women, marginalised groups, and the working class. In the context of the group show Hu(man) Nature, the work gains an added nuance in that the shadow work and exploitation of women mirrors the ruthless and systematic exploitation of nature by capitalist societies.

Glasgow Autonomous Space

Photos by Anaïs Janze-Natera and

                           Tommaso Ranfagni

Video work by Struan McBride

Tontine Gallery Show

Photos by Isabelle Thul

 © 2020  giacinta frisillo

Glasgow Autonomous Space